Archive for September, 2009

It’s testing time!

Friday, September 25th, 2009

You’ve all been asking, pleading, begging for another assessment.  Well, the good news is, you have one coming up next week – YEAH! 

Block H students will take it on THURSDAY 1st OCTOBER. 

Block D students will take it on FRIDAY 2nd OCTOBER.

Look through your notes from class, and go back through all the blog posts on atomic structure, the Periodic Table, electron configuration, metals vs non-metals, ionic and covalent bonding, Lewis structures, writing formulae, balancing equations et al.

COME AND SEE ME DURING TUTORIALS if you need help.

Ionic vs covalent properties

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

We will be doing a lab comparing the properties of ionic and covalent compounds, and trying to answer this question:

How are the properties of substances explained by theories of structure and bonding?

Read the instruction sheet for full details: LAB – How are the properties of substances explained by theories of bonding and structure

Defence against disease

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
antibody from bindingsitesera.com

antibody from bindingsitesera.com

Our bodies remain healthy despite coming into contact with germs and microbes many times a day.  This is due to the fact that we have a pretty efficient defence system that protects us from disease.  See here for a presentation on this topic.  For Higher Level students, you need to go further, so here is another useful presentation.

You will be required to make notes for yourself and your classmates on some aspect of this topic.  You may choose to create a podcast, slideshow, prezi or simply a set of written notes.  Get creative!  To see your assignment, please click on the following links. 

Defense groups – BLOCK B

Defense groups – BLOCK F

Defense groups – BLOCK G

Transport system

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

Here is a really useful presentation, thanks to Mr Hobbins. How your Heart beats

Please also continue to work on your heart rate labs.  See the rubric below.  Due on OCTOBER 1st.

Listed below are some of the finer points that are often the difference between a ‘c’ and a ’p’ grade in an aspect. You should be able to answer ‘yes’ to each of the questions.

Planning A Is your research question sufficiently focused?Have you made a quantitative prediction in your hypothesis?Have you fully explained your hypothesis?Are your variables clearly shown i.e. not just one word?
Planning B Have you included the volumes and concentrations of solutions used, sizes of glassware etc?Are all of your controlled variables covered?Do you plan to do enough runs?Have you included a clearly labeled diagram?
Data Collection Is raw data neatly presented in a table?Does the table have an uncertainty and unit value in the header row?Have you made qualitative observations too e.g colour changes?Are your significant figures/decimal places consistent?
Data Processing and Presentation If you have plotted a graph, have you labeled axes and drawn a line of best fit to extract more information?Have you processed the uncertainty due to the equipment and shown this in your final answer (HL)?Have you commented on the uncertainties of the equipment and how significant they might be in affecting the reliability of your result (SL)?
Conclusion and Evaluation Have you compared the result with literature data?Does the percentage uncertainty cover your percentage error (HL)?Have you identified flaws in the technique and suggested ways to improve them (N.B. ‘I ran out of time’ is not suitable)?
General Is every detail of the write up your own work?Have you written in the passive voice?Have you referenced any sources?

 

DP Biology Lab Report Format

 

Please follow this format for each practical investigation – it will help us see that you have covered all of the aspects that are needed to be marked ‘Complete’.

1. Research question or aim:  Clear and to the point. State the dependent and independent variables and species name [e.g. Apis mellifera] in the research question

2. Hypothesis: Predictions with reasons based on scientific theory or published data. What do you think is going to happen with reasons based on scientific theory or published data. This is then stated as a prediction as what you think will happen in your experiment. IF (independent variable) THEN (dependent variable) BECAUSE..”

3. Variables: Independent, Dependent, Controlled (a list here is enough).

4. List apparatus and materials (with amounts/sizes/quantities).

5. Method to control variables: Keep at least 3 factors constant to reduce experimental error.  Give a reason for each one.

6. Method for collection of raw data: What are you changing? How? What are you measuring? How? What units? How many data points will you produce? State them clearly. What will you do with the data collected?

7. Large, clear diagram or photo of set-up, clearly labeled.

8. Collect and record raw data, giving units and uncertainties.  e.g. using a mm ruler, error is +/- 1mm

9. Present the raw data in a large, clear, self-designed table. Give an informative title.  i.e. – ‘table of results’ is not descriptive enough.

10. Process raw data: Choose an appropriate graph/ chart/ statistical test.  Perform it correctly, giving a worked example for all calculations used.

11. Present processed data: Make table or graph large, clear and well labeled.  Include units and an informative title.

12. Draw conclusions: What do your results tell you?  What does this mean? Explain using scientific theory.  Does it agree with your hypothesis?  Compare collected data with published (literature) data if possible. Reference it appropriately.

13. Evaluate procedures and results: Identify (min 3) weaknesses, limitations and errors in the results and the method.

14. Improve the investigation: Suggest realistic methods to improve on each of the weaknesses mentioned above.

15. References.

Balancing equations

Friday, September 18th, 2009
seesaw crossing by rachaelvoorhees on flickr

seesaw crossing by rachaelvoorhees on flickr

Many of you found today’s lesson challenging.  That’s ok!  Keep practising and you will become more confident in writing formulae, naming compounds and balancing equations.  Nobody said it was easy!

Here are some links to try:-

http://funbasedlearning.com/chemisty/chemBalancer/default.htm

http://chemistry.csudh.edu/lechelpcs/rxnbalancingcsn7.html

http://www.creative-chemistry.org.uk/gcse/revision/equations/01.htm

Do you know the difference?

Thursday, September 10th, 2009
alveoli in the lungs from wellcome images

alveoli in the lungs from wellcome images

Do you know the difference between respiration, breathing and gas exchange?

You will, hopefully, by the end of the next topic.  Here are some resources to help you.  This one gives basic factual information.  This one is interactive.  Enjoy!

Lewis structures

Thursday, September 10th, 2009
dot and cross diagram wikimedia commons

dot and cross diagram wikimedia commons

Lewis structures, also known as dot and cross diagrams, represent the arrangement of valence electrons in elements and compounds.  This site has a detailed explanation of how to draw them.

These sites are ones we will use in class to practice.  Feel free to practice at home too 🙂

http://chemsite.lsrhs.net/bonding/flashLewis.html

http://itl.chem.ufl.edu/2045/lectures/lewis_ramyess/pjb_ramyess.html

http://education.jlab.org/elementmath/index.html

http://education.jlab.org/indexpages/teachers.php

http://www.stolaf.edu/depts/chemistry/courses/toolkits/121/js/lewis/

New Glogster homework!

Thursday, September 10th, 2009
Hydrogen from wikimedia commons

Hydrogen from wikimedia commons

Hooray!  You did such a good job on the first glogster assignment, your teachers have decided to give you another one.

Each student will be given ONE element from the periodic table.  Your task is to produce a glogster poster with information about that element.  The kinds of things to include are:

atomic structure, mass number, uses, reactivity, state, colour, etc

Remember to include pictures and images as well as text.

We will put up your posters in the shape of the periodic table outside room 1090/1091.  We’ll use the same rubric as last time to assess this.

Testing, testing, 1 2 3

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

REMINDER

Block B will have their test on Topics 6.1 Digestion and 6.2 Transport System on THURSDAY 17th SEPTEMBERBlock F will have theirs on WEDNESDAY 16th SEPTEMBER.  Usual format – part multiple choice, part short answers – all from past IB papers.

COME TO TUTORIALS if you need help with anything.

Checklist for heart rate lab

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

Use this checklist, thanks to Mr. Hobbins, to help you with your heart rate lab.

Listed below are some of the finer points that are often the difference between a ‘c’ and a ’p’ grade in an aspect. You should be able to answer ‘yes’ to each of the questions.

Planning A Is your research question sufficiently focused?

Have you made a quantitative prediction in your hypothesis?

Have you fully explained your hypothesis?

Are your variables clearly shown i.e. not just one word?

Planning B

Have you included the volumes and concentrations of solutions used, sizes of glassware etc?

Are all of your controlled variables covered?

Do you plan to do enough runs?

Have you included a clearly labeled diagram?

Data Collection Is raw data neatly presented in a table?

Does the table have an uncertainty and unit value in the header row?

Have you made qualitative observations too e.g colour changes?

Are your significant figures/decimal places consistent?

Data Processing and Presentation If you have plotted a graph, have you labeled axes and drawn a line of best fit to extract more information?

Have you processed the uncertainty due to the equipment and shown this in your final answer (HL)?

Have you commented on the uncertainties of the equipment and how significant they might be in affecting the reliability of your result (SL)?

Conclusion and Evaluation Have you compared the result with literature data?

Does the percentage uncertainty cover your percentage error (HL)?

Have you identified flaws in the technique and suggested ways to improve them (N.B. ‘I ran out of time’ is not suitable)?

General Is every detail of the write up your own work?

Have you written in the passive voice?

Have you referenced any sources?

DP Biology Lab Report Format

Please follow this format for each practical investigation – it will help us see that you have covered all of the aspects that are needed to be marked ‘Complete’.

1. Research question or aim:  Clear and to the point. State the dependent and independent variables and species name [e.g. Apis mellifera] in the research question

2. Hypothesis: Predictions with reasons based on scientific theory or published data. What do you think is going to happen with reasons based on scientific theory or published data. This is then stated as a prediction as what you think will happen in your experiment. IF (independent variable) THEN (dependent variable) BECAUSE..”

3. Variables: Independent, Dependent, Controlled (a list here is enough).

4. List apparatus and materials (with amounts/sizes/quantities).

5. Method to control variables: Keep at least 3 factors constant to reduce experimental error.  Give a reason for each one.

6. Method for collection of raw data: What are you changing? How? What are you measuring? How? What units? How many data points will you produce? State them clearly. What will you do with the data collected?

7. Large, clear diagram or photo of set-up, clearly labeled.

8. Collect and record raw data, giving units and uncertainties.  e.g. using a mm ruler, error is +/- 1mm

9. Present the raw data in a large, clear, self-designed table. Give an informative title.  i.e. – ‘table of results’ is not descriptive enough.

10. Process raw data: Choose an appropriate graph/ chart/ statistical test.  Perform it correctly, giving a worked example for all calculations used.

11. Present processed data: Make table or graph large, clear and well labeled.  Include units and an informative title.

12. Draw conclusions: What do your results tell you?  What does this mean? Explain using scientific theory.  Does it agree with your hypothesis?  Compare collected data with published (literature) data if possible. Reference it appropriately.

13. Evaluate procedures and results: Identify (min 3) weaknesses, limitations and errors in the results and the method.

14. Improve the investigation: Suggest realistic methods to improve on each of the weaknesses mentioned above.

15. References.