Posts Tagged ‘microscope’

Looking at cells

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

cheek cells by Ah Pao on flickr

This week we’ll be getting the microscopes out and you will be making your own slides of different cells.  On the link below you will find the instructions for how to do this.  I suggest you read them before class.  This will save you time in the lesson, and you will be able to make more slides 🙂

Observing cells with light microscopes

plant cells leaf by Ah Pao on flickr

Once you have made your slides, you will be expected to draw biological diagrams of what you observe.  The rubric that will be used to assess these drawings is here:

Grade 9 Rubric for the marking of scientific drawings 

Historical biology or biological history?

Friday, March 11th, 2011

microscope by staceyjoy on flickr

This week we’ll be looking at the development of the cell theory.  You will need to research the contribution made by each of the following scientists, find a picture of the person or what they made or saw, then use the information to construct a timeline.  Put all that into a presentation of some kind  [prezi / dipity /anything else appropriate].  Your presentation should also include the main points of the cell theory.  Enter the url of your work as a link in a comment on this post.

1.      Hans and Zacharias Janssen

2.      Robert Hooke

3.      Anton Leeuwenhoek

4.      Matthias Schleiden

5.      Theodor Schwann

6.      Rudolf Virchow

7.      August Weismann

Can you label the parts of the microscope on this drawing? Parts-of-a-microscope

Application of lenses

Thursday, May 13th, 2010

telescope by Waifer X on flickr

Here are links to a couple of sites on ray diagrams.  This first one is factual.  This one is interactive, and covers the different types of image obtained when you place your object various distances from the the lens. 

Make sure you know the difference between a real and virtual image, an inverted and an upright image, and a magnified and diminished image.

Now that you know all about refraction, and how light bends as it passes through lenses, it’s time to take a look at where we use lenses in our daily (or not so daily) lives.  Microscopes, telescopes, cameras, binoculars, all contain at least one lens.  Your task is to select one application of lenses and do some research on it.  Prepare a glogster poster of your findings.  You must explain what type or types of lenses are present, what refraction has to do with your chosen application, and how it works.  Follow the links here to help get you started.

Looking at cells

Monday, October 19th, 2009
cheek cells by Ah Pao on flickr

cheek cells by Ah Pao on flickr

This week we’ll be getting the microscopes out and you will be making your own slides of different cells.  On the link below you will find the instructions for how to do this.  I suggest you read them before class.  This will save you time in the lesson, and you will be able to make more slides 🙂

Observing cells with light microscopes

 

 

 

plant cells leaf by Ah Pao on flickr

plant cells leaf by Ah Pao on flickr

Once you have made your slides, you will be expected to draw biological diagrams of what you observe.  The rubric that will be used to assess these drawings is here:

Grade 9 Rubric for the marking of scientific drawings 

Can you name the parts of a microscope?

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009

Can you name the parts of a microscope?  Open the attachment, and leave a comment reply with your answers.  We’ll find out who is right soon 🙂

 Parts of a microscope

History meets Biology = Biostory?

Monday, October 12th, 2009
microscope by biology big brother on flickr

microscope by biology big brother on flickr

This week we’ll be looking at the development of the cell theory.  You will need to research the contribution made by each of the following scientists, find a picture of the person or what they made or saw, then use the information to construct a timeline.  Put all that into a powerpoint or prezi presentation.  Done! 

1.      Hans and Zacharias Janssen

2.      Robert Hooke

3.      Anton Leeuwenhoek

4.      Matthias Schleiden

5.      Theodor Schwann

6.      Rudolf Virchow

7.      August Weismann

Here is some more info and the rubric that will be used to assess this activity.  Integrated Science 1 cell theory activity